Full Name
Mariam Maltseva
Job Title
PhD Student
Company
University of Ottawa
City (Work Address)
Ottawa
State/Province/County (Work Address)
ON
Speaker Bio
Mariam Maltseva is a second year PhD student at University of Ottawa studying under supervision of Dr. Marc-André Langlois. The continued viral evolution of SARS-CoV-2 and waning immunity after long periods post vaccination contribute to decreased vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 infection and transmission. In my project, we explore the role of mucosal immunity and a novel intranasal vaccine platform to provide improved cross-protection against rapidly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and prevent its transmission in the effort to curtail the COVID-19 pandemic.
Abstract Title
Characterization of humoral immune responses to an intranasal SARS-CoV-2 protein subunit vaccine in model animals
Abstract Summary
The continued viral evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and waning immunity after long periods post vaccination contribute to decreased vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 infection and transmission. Currently approved parenteral vaccines induce robust systemic immunity which protects against severe disease yet leaves the individual vulnerable to infection at the primary point of viral entry at the upper respiratory tract. Here, we describe an intranasally administrated SARS-CoV-2 subunit protein vaccine candidates adjuvanted with cholera toxin or an archaeal lipid mucosal adjuvant. We show robust induction of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA and IgM in plasma, nasal wash and bronchoalveolar lavage in mice vaccinated with two doses of adjuvanted protein vaccines, but not with protein alone. Local and systemic antibody titers correlated with neutralization potential against homologous and variants of SARS-CoV-2. Our findings highlight a novel adjuvanted subunit vaccine platform to provide improved cross-protection against rapidly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and prevent its transmission in the effort to curtail the COVID-19 pandemic.
Mariam Maltseva